1. centuriespast:

VALDÉS LEAL, Juan de
In Ictu Oculi
1670-72
Oil on canvas, 220 x 216 cm
Hospital de la Caridad, Seville

    centuriespast:

    VALDÉS LEAL, Juan de

    In Ictu Oculi

    1670-72

    Oil on canvas, 220 x 216 cm

    Hospital de la Caridad, Seville

  2. 
VALDÉS LEAL, Juan de
Assumption of the Virgin
1659
Oil on canvas
National Gallery of Art, Washington


    VALDÉS LEAL, Juan de

    Assumption of the Virgin

    1659

    Oil on canvas

    National Gallery of Art, Washington

  3. Make some “Friends” they said, it will be fun, they said..

    Make some “Friends” they said, it will be fun, they said..

  4. ..

    ..

  5. Amazing ..

    Amazing ..

  6. "You meet the greatest people online, some who become your best friends, at least for a while. When you meet, at first there is scepticism about whether they are really the people they claim to be, are they the people in the photo, are they stalking me, are they marching to some psychotic drum beat? Then over chats and over the reading of tens to hundreds of posts and IMs you come to understand that they are clever souls, kindred souls with passions and animosities, they have been burned by someone else and yet they are always burning for someone else, they rub you one way and you rub them another, and the back and forth goes this way and that, and before you know it something changes in your daiy routine and you fall into the virtual embrace of your Internet friend for counsel and to bare your bones, you lay it all out on the table, hang all your dirty laundry out to dry expecting that they will not judge you, that they can’t because you are Internet friends, and at that moment you both transcend the Internet part of it and you become friends.
    The exchange goes on between you both, everything is going perfectly and is so convenient because the timing works for everyone, you are both online, your messages and thoughs beam back and forth all week, all day, at all meals and at all hours. Then one day something happens, you can’t quite say what it was, one of you has changed. Maybe it was the three days someone had to go offline because of a family emergency, or maybe it was just because your computer broke and you were stuck with something inconvenient like your phone, which isn’t even a smart phone, or maybe it is as silly as someone having a change of heart, actually being the fickle human just the way we all are in person. There is something about not having the ability to sit infront of a wetted pair of eyes, or being able to admire up close the smooth complexion of a surface of skin with a different tan coloring than the usually exposed bits, or maybe just the lack of having that person’s warm voice resonate in your ears when all you have around you is cacophony and what you really needed was a soothing hum, a simple vibration, a tug on one of the instruments in your mind, perhaps your cello, and everything might have been the way it always was. But something did change, and although you can’t put your finger on what it was, you feel you know something, like the way you know it’s still not time to get up in the morning when your mind comes to attention, before you open your eyes to check the clock, before the alarm clock even rings.
    From then on, the Internet thing between you two is broken. Someone deactivates, email addresses change, you move to another city, all of your IDs change to another name, your passport is reissued with a new photo, and you are off, off to explore something new, without your best online friend… and then you meet another, and the cycle repeats itself like seasons, only shorter and with less of a wardrobe change. You meet the greatest people online, and they rarely last as long as you wish."
  7. Alexander Rybak - “OAH” (Official Music Video) (by AlexanderRybakVideo)

    A funny song x)

  8. wildcat2030:

Truth is provisional, shifting, temporary and subjective, and the quest for elucidation is forever incomplete and wholly narrative. Fiction allows scientists to explore reality in the way the day job doesn’t allow One of the mistakes that people – and I include scientists and journalists in my definition of “people”, because, well, I’m charitable like that – is that they think science is all about discovering the “truth”. Scientist David Sloan-Wilson went so far as characterising science as a religion that had truth as its God. But science is nothing of the kind. “Truth” is a concept that is best left to theologians and philosophers. Science, on the other hand, is better characterised not as a religion, but as a rational process, in which the goal is not the attainment of truth, but the quantification of doubt. You will recall, I am sure, the recent fuss about the Higgs boson. Scientists didn’t “discover” the elusive and misnamed “God Particle” behind my sofa (goodness knows, it’s got to be there among the dust, discarded dog chews and odd socks) and say “Aha!” No, the process was framed as a quantification of doubt, in which observations were slowly collated to such a degree that the probability of the Higgs’s existence being a fluke was reduced to no more than five furlongs per fortnight. “Truth”, you see, is as elusive as that perishing pentasigma’ed particle. (via Different kinds of truth: religion, science and fiction | Henry Gee | Science | guardian.co.uk)

    wildcat2030:

    Truth is provisional, shifting, temporary and subjective, and the quest for elucidation is forever incomplete and wholly narrative. Fiction allows scientists to explore reality in the way the day job doesn’t allow One of the mistakes that people – and I include scientists and journalists in my definition of “people”, because, well, I’m charitable like that – is that they think science is all about discovering the “truth”. Scientist David Sloan-Wilson went so far as characterising science as a religion that had truth as its God. But science is nothing of the kind. “Truth” is a concept that is best left to theologians and philosophers. Science, on the other hand, is better characterised not as a religion, but as a rational process, in which the goal is not the attainment of truth, but the quantification of doubt. You will recall, I am sure, the recent fuss about the Higgs boson. Scientists didn’t “discover” the elusive and misnamed “God Particle” behind my sofa (goodness knows, it’s got to be there among the dust, discarded dog chews and odd socks) and say “Aha!” No, the process was framed as a quantification of doubt, in which observations were slowly collated to such a degree that the probability of the Higgs’s existence being a fluke was reduced to no more than five furlongs per fortnight. “Truth”, you see, is as elusive as that perishing pentasigma’ed particle. (via Different kinds of truth: religion, science and fiction | Henry Gee | Science | guardian.co.uk)

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